Finding part-time work #JobShop Pop-ups

If you are looking for a part-time or seasonal job you can ‘pop’ along to our Job Shop Pop-ups, taking place over the 2 weeks of welcome week. Dates are:

Ambleside: Wednesday 20 September, 10.30am-12.30pm in the Barn

Brampton Road, Carlisle: Tuesday 26 September, 11.00am-1.00pml in The Works (refectory)

Lancaster: Tuesday 26 September, 11.30am-1.30pm in the Gateway building

Fusehill Street, Carlisle: Thursday 28 September, 11.00am-1.00pm in the Learning Gateway

Don’t worry if you can’t make it to one of the pop-ups, as we also have a handy guide that you can download HERE!

 

Support is available from your Careers and Employability Service with career planning, CVs and applications, interview skills, practice interviews and more. Contact careers@cumbria.ac.uk with your careers queries.

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Where’s Gary? Welcome Week 2017 Competition

Gary-suitcase

Gary is the Careers and Employability  Service’s gorilla mascot, and he’s been on another trip around the world – can you identify which landmarks he visited this summer?

Follow Gary around the world as he visits famous landmarks for a chance to win a £40 book token!

How to enter: Gary visited five famous landmarks on his round-the-world trip – all you have to do is identify which landmarks Gary visited from the postcards he sent home. Simply complete the form below and click submit to enter the competition.

Keep up to date with all of the latest careers news and job vacancies by following us on Twitter and Facebook.

This competition closes at midnight on Friday 29 September and is open to students at the University of Cumbria ONLY.  Terms and Conditions apply.

Summer Career Fix: Participate in your community

What are you doing this summer to help you stand out from the crowd?

Gary’s bags are packed and he’s ready to jet off to places far sunnier than Cumbria. But he’s not off for a lazy beach holiday – he’s going to be doing one small thing each week that will help in his future career. He doesn’t know what that career is just yet, but that’s ok – most of these things can be done even if you aren’t 100% sure what you want to do. And if you need some help finding your path, you can always email the Careers & Employability service for some advice and guidance: careers@cumbria.ac.uk

So what’s Gary doing this week?

It’s the last week of the Summer Career Fix, so by now you should be well on the way to improving your career!

This week, Gary is participating in conversations on social media with his network.

LinkedIn is a great place to build up your network and develop those relationships that you already have. Following companies and professional bodies on social media is one thing, but you will really begin to see the benefit once you start participating in the conversations happening on there.

We hope you enjoyed this #SummerCareerFix series. Remember that support is available from your Careers and Employability Service with career planning, CVs and applications, interview skills, practice interviews and more. Contact careers@cumbria.ac.uk with your careers queries.

Summer Career Fix: Search jobs to identify skills

What are you doing this summer to help you stand out from the crowd?

Gary’s bags are packed and he’s ready to jet off to places far sunnier than Cumbria. But he’s not off for a lazy beach holiday – he’s going to be doing one small thing each week that will help in his future career. He doesn’t know what that career is just yet, but that’s ok – most of these things can be done even if you aren’t 100% sure what you want to do. And if you need some help finding your path, you can always email the Careers & Employability service for some advice and guidance: careers@cumbria.ac.uk

So what’s Gary doing this week?

This week, Gary is searching for graduate jobs that are similar to what he wants to do, and then using the information in the job description to identify skills and experience that he will need to develop.

This is a great way of identifying real-world skills that employers look for in your chosen career sector. It also gives you an idea of the kind of roles that are out there, what employers want, 09and will help you to understand more about the sector.

If you are doing the Career Ahead award, you can also use this role for the ‘Gold’ part of the award – find out more here.

Come back next week for the last instalment in this year’s #SummerCareerFix series.

Support is available from your Careers and Employability Service with career planning, CVs and applications, interview skills, practice interviews and more. Contact careers@cumbria.ac.uk with your careers queries.

Graduate Destinations – Thomas Hanley, Reporter

Today we’ve been speaking with Thomas Hanley who graduated from the BA (Hons) English course in 2016. We asked him about getting his first graduate job as a Reporter.


Thomas Hanley – BA (Hons) English graduate, University of Cumbria

 

Where are you from originally?

I’m originally from Dumfries, Scotland.

 

What made you choose the University of Cumbria?

I was offered places at both the University of Glasgow and the University of Cumbria. I opted for Cumbria as I received a personal email from Dr. Stephen Longstaffe which detailed the strengths of my application and how he felt the course could help with my personal development.

 

Which course did you do?

BA (Hons) English

 

Why did you choose your course?

I’ve held a passion for reading and writing ever since I was a child, and felt that the English course could help me turn my passion into a future form of employment.

 

What did you like most about your course?

My favourite part of the course was engaging with peers and lecturers who held a similar passion to me. The varying forms of assessment also ensured that the course was challenging yet enjoyable, while helping me to develop into a proficient and well-rounded communicator.

 

What is your current job title?

Reporter

 

Which company do you work for?

I work for DNG Media, the largest independent publisher in Dumfries and Galloway which has four weekly newspapers, a website, and a range of specialist publications.

 

What does your role involve?

I research and write on local events and human interest stories, reporting on a wide range of subjects including politics, business, sport, entertainment, and arts and culture. I interview people in a range of different circumstances, and attend council meetings, court proceedings, and sports matches.

 

What was the application process for your job like?

I had to attach a cover letter and CV that I targeted specifically for the role I was applying for. I was then invited for my first interview.

 

How did you prepare for your interview? Any tips for others?

To prepare for the first interview, I ensured that I was aware of what DNG Media offers as a company, as well as having a strong knowledge of the areas it reaches and covers. I took time to read some of the companies’ print and online product in order to gauge what I felt its strengths were, and if I could identify any areas where I could bring fresh ideas or perspective. I also made sure I understood and could adapt the writing style DNG Media employs, as it varied greatly from the style used for academic assignments.

 

What was the interview process like?

The interview process saw me attend a first interview. I was then asked back and tasked with rewriting a police press release in house style. Finally, I was invited for a second interview, where I was subsequently offered the role.

 

Were there any surprises?

In hindsight, I feel that my knowledge of politics within the region could have been greater. Although confident in my knowledge of national politics, I should have recognised that I was applying for a role reporting on local news and therefore knowledge of politics at a local level would have been more valuable and relevant.

 

If you had to say one thing to someone aiming to get a job like yours what would it be?

I would stress the importance of taking on work experience and extracurricular activities. With the job market being as competitive as it is, especially in an occupation like journalism, a degree alone is no longer a guarantee of employment. I would also advise that being a good writer does not always equate to being a good reporter. You need to be confident and tenacious to make sure you get the story you are after, while holding the capacity to step over the line and ask the questions that many people can’t or won’t, but would love the answers to.

Want to find a job like Thomas’?

Contact careers@cumbria.ac.uk for advice and support.

Find out more about your Careers and Employability Service here.

Summer Career Fix: Join Professional Bodies

What are you doing this summer to help you stand out from the crowd?

Gary’s bags are packed and he’s ready to jet off to places far sunnier than Cumbria. But he’s not off for a lazy beach holiday – he’s going to be doing one small thing each week that will help in his future career. He doesn’t know what that career is just yet, but that’s ok – most of these things can be done even if you aren’t 100% sure what you want to do. And if you need some help finding your path, you can always email the Careers & Employability service for some advice and guidance: careers@cumbria.ac.uk

So what’s Gary doing this week?

 

This week, Gary is finding out about the different professional bodies in his chosen sector, and joining as a student.

Being a member of your career sector’s professional body gives you access to knowledge, resources and a network of people already working in your area. You will often be able to join at a discounted rate (sometimes even for free!), and you will receive information and advice about how to develop your career. There are usually CPD courses available as well, which is great for your on-going development.

For some careers you need to be a member of a professional body in order to practice – for example accountancy, law, psychology, nursing and midwifery. You may already be aware of these as they accredit your course. Even if you don’t need to be a member to practice, it’s still a good idea to find out about what’s available and what you will get from being a member.

Here’s a list of professional bodies: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_professional_associations_in_the_United_Kingdom

You can find out more about the benefits of being a member of professional bodies here: https://targetjobs.co.uk/professional-qualification-and-accreditation.

 

Come back next week for another #SummerCareerFix 

Support is available from your Careers and Employability Service with career planning, CVs and applications, interview skills, practice interviews and more. Contact careers@cumbria.ac.uk with your careers queries.

Graduate Destinations – Charlotte Vaughan, Primary Teacher

Today we’ve been speaking with Charlotte Vaughan who graduated from the BA (Hons) with QTS Primary Education course this year. We asked her about getting her first graduate job as a Teacher.

 

Where are you from originally?

I am from the Carlisle area.

 

What made you choose the University of Cumbria?

I wanted to stay close to home and I knew that the university had a good reputation for teacher training.

 

Which course did you do?

BA (Hons) with QTS Primary Education

 

Why did you choose your course?

I knew that I wanted to become a teacher and I felt that the degree course suited me better than taking a school direct approach.

 

What did you like most about your course?

The university staff and lecturers are friendly and approachable which made studying with them really enjoyable. Being able to study in small tutor groups meant that we received very specific feedback which helped us develop as students and teachers.

 

Have you accessed support from the Careers and Employability Service?

I completed the Career Ahead Bronze and Silver awards and I attended a practice teaching interview with the Careers Service. This gave me the opportunity to develop my interview skills and it gave me confidence going into interviews.

 

Best piece of careers advice you have ever been given…

Don’t apply to every job going, wait until the right one for you comes along.

 

What was the application/interview process for your new job like?

I had to complete a detailed application form after which I was shortlisted for interview. I had to prepare a 30 minute maths session for a class of Yr 5/6 children which is trickier than you think because the 30 minutes just flies by! Following that I had an interview with the school council which involved KS2 children asking questions of their own devising (this was my favourite part). On the second day of the interview process, I was invited to return to the school to complete a short written task and then have a formal panel interview with the headteacher, two school governors and the school vicar (who is also a governor). Thankfully, after all that, I only had to wait a couple of hours to find out that I had been successful.

 

How did you prepare for your interview? Any tips for others?

I made a bank of possible interview questions and wrote answers to them, which I then practised – a lot! I spoke to lots of teachers while I was preparing for my interview and they gave me plenty of great advice and tips. I would advise others to research your school thoroughly, prepare as many possible answers as you can think of and talk to others who have already been through the process.

 

Were there any surprises/anything you didn’t expect?

Not really, I was very well prepared.

 

What is your new job title?

Permanent, Full-time KS2 Teacher.

 

Who is your new employer?

Wiggonby C of E Primary School.

 

When will you start?

Officially, September 2017. Unofficially, now!!

 

If you had to say one thing to someone aiming to get a job like yours what would it be?

Put lots of time and effort into your preparation and interview because it really is worth it!

 

Want to find a job like Charlotte’s?

Contact careers@cumbria.ac.uk for advice and support.

Find out more about your Careers and Employability Service here.