Category Archives: job description

Friday Featured Vacancies – IT Manager / Communications & Marketing Intern

cumbria community foundationCommunications & Marketing Intern

Cumbria Community Foundation is looking for a dynamic and motivated person to help with their communications and marketing needs. The full-time role will be for 12 months based at their office in Dovenby.

The position provides an opportunity to further develop experience in marketing, communications, research and events management as well as gaining experience of social policy, grant making and community philanthropy.

The aim of the role is to provide support to staff members across a range of activities and functions. The position will be packaged as support to a range of projects to ensure effective management of the intern’s time.

The Community Foundation exists to improve the quality of the community life in Cumbria by making grants to voluntary organisations and individuals and managing grant making funds on behalf of individuals, companies and government organisations.

Established in September 1999 the Foundation has given out almost £30 million in grants to more than 4,000 groups and 4,000 individuals.

The Foundation has a strong donor base and is held in high regard by key stakeholders.  As an organisation committed to the local community and a track record of delivery they are looking for a key member of the team to contribute to the exciting development of the organisation.

Salary £14,000 – £16,000 per annum

For further information including the job description and application form, visit their website http://www.cumbriafoundation.org/

Closing date 9.00am Monday 16th May 2016

Interview date 24th May

 

 

logoIT Manager

Carlisle Brass is looking for an IT Manager. This role offers the opportunity to travel, locations include Carlisle, Blackburn, Kirkham and Dubai.

To apply send a CV and covering letter to cgraham@carlislebrass.com.

Find out more about Carlisle Brass on their website – http://www.carlislebrass.com

Closing date for applications is 10 May 2016.

 

JOB DESCRIPTION

Title:                     IT Manager                        

Reports to:         Head of Finance

Dotted line to:  CBG MD / Divisional FD

Location:            Carlisle

Sites:                     Carlisle, Blackburn, Kirkham, Dubai

Salary:                  £40-45k (37.5 hour week with out of hours and weekend work required occasionally to meet business continuity needs)

Benefits:             3% pension contribution, DIS 2 x’s salary, 23 days holiday                               

 

Background

The role arises as a result of the need to strengthen the IT function within the business, in the light of increased growth and technology dependence as well as the increased complexity arising from a proposed ERP replacement in 2017.

The hardware infrastructure for the current systems is largely based at Carlisle, with remote servers at Blackburn and Kirkham.

The parent Group’s IT infrastructure will also continue to evolve towards consolidation and standardisation of solutions for its other UK businesses based in Daventry, and this role holder should therefore expect to collaborate with other parts of the Arran Isle group in achieving  realistic synergies. It is likely that this would comprise further virtualisation of storage and servers, as well as a roll out of virtual desktop technology

 

Job Purpose      

Deliver an infrastructure which continues to support the growth of the organisation and become knowledgeable about all its aspects to ensure continuous support for the operational hours of the business.

Provide day to day management and leadership of support staff making sure that appropriate skills are in place and effectively deployed in order to meet the function’s responsibilities to its users at all sites.

There will also be scope to provide forward looking guidance and strategy on where the Group can deliver more through IT, as well as responding to and developing ideas arising in the business units.

 

ERP replacement

Carlisle Brass currently operates a range of software applications to control the business, largely based around a bespoke database (Corserine), and developed in .NET from an original Phoenix database. Much of this development has been undertaken in house by the current IT manager. Corserine has in turn has been integrated with Sage 200 to provide the financial reporting and analysis. It is intended that the IT Manager will remain within the business focussed mainly on support of the legacy systems and immediate development requirements of these.

Carlisle Brass is currently planning to replace its existing legacy  systems with a fully integrated ERP solution in 2017. It is highly likely this will be based around a MS Dynamics Navision solution already developed for other businesses in the Arran Isle group, and being implemented during  2016.

The successful candidate will play a key role in supporting this project from the early stages through to post completion support.

The business does not currently have Navision experience available, but this will be supported by other sites and experienced third party implementers.

 

Key responsibilities and Standards of Performance

  1. Helpdesk resources and performance including reporting and improvement programmes
  2. Allocation of support resources and software resilience as agreed with business units including up time
  3. Coordination with external support providers which includes managing their performance and negotiation of contracts to support the operational requirements of the business
  4. Developing business specific Service Level Agreements (SLA) for each business unit and subsequently ensuring that IT service meets or exceed agreed targets
  5. Contribute to the development of the IT strategy encompassing hardware, software, security, resources and other aspects that support the achievement of the business plans of each business location
  6. Project planning and management of infrastructure maintenance and development projects including engagement and management of 3rd party contractors and service providers as and when required
  7. Creation of Disaster Recovery plans covering all aspects of IT resources and service for each business including periodic testing and subsequent updating. This includes from minor incidents such as theft of mobile phones to larger scale issues such as downtime on main systems
  8. Managing the hardware estate for the business units including:
    1. Physical servers, switches, firewalls and other associated hardware at Carlisle and other UK locations
    2. Local PC’s, photocopiers
    3. Telecoms: fixed line, broadband, mobile phones & devices, wifi, scanners
    4. Video conferencing assets
  1. Development and roll out of IT policies across all locations, periodic maintenance and enforcement
  2. Overall management of website hosting for all business units including the development and monitoring of service level performance from 3rd party resource providers
  3. Management of all aspects of IT security for all locations including PCI compliance, hardware and software integrity and resilience
  4. Contribute to wider company projects that require IT input such as new process planning, new functional specific software such as demand planning or business reporting
  5. Form part of the wider Group’s IT resource by working collaboratively with other IT professionals in the business and contributing to the IT Board
  6. Keep up to date with new software and technologies that can make our business better and build competencies within the IT team

 

Other Relationships

Coordinate with Divisional Finance based in Daventry, UK.

Liaise with other IT professionals around the Group

IT of customer/supplier functions around the UK

 

IT / Business systems

Sage 200 accounting software used for financial reporting

Interfaced with internally developed Corserine / Phoenix operating systems

Local IT hardware infrastructure includes virtualised servers and remote servers at business locations in Kirkham and Blackburn.

 

Background, education and experience 

Extensive 1st/2nd and 3rd Line support for a variety of infrastructure & application environments (pre-dominantly MS focused)

Extensive Design and deployment of Windows/PC based hardware

Management of an IT function within a larger multi-site SME or

Management of teams within an outsourced IT services environment

 

Qualifications

Good general education with at least strong A level or equivalent education.  Degree level education likely.  Appropriate technical certifications to demonstrate technical areas of expertise.

 

Technical Experience

  • LAN/WAN Network
  • MS Server platforms
  • Full and Thin client architecture including Citrix
  • Hardware performance monitoring and improvement
  • SQL
  • Business Continuity, backup & recovery
  • VMware
  • Antivirus, Anti-spam & Firewall management
  • PCI compliance
  • Website/Ecommerce/EDI
  • SQL
  • Programming, e.g. Linux, .NET
  • Video conferencing (Lifesize)
  • Support ERP and Business Intelligence tools

The template for the future ERP system is  based around MS Dynamics NAV 16 (Navision) with extensive use of  Phocas (BI) and Jet Reports (BI)for much of the reporting requirements. Experience in any of these would be advantageous

 

Organisation Structure

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Interview Skills – Using the STAR Approach

Preparing for Interview? Try using the STAR Model!

From: http://www.flickr.com/photos/clarism_4/

Competency based interviews (or situational/behaviour interviews) are becoming the approach of choice for many employers. This type of recruitment process allows candidates to give situational examples of when they have achieved particular outcomes. Competency based interviews (CBI) are used as benchmarks for interviewers. Using this style of questioning means they can rate and evaluate candidates and their ability to fit into the new work environment instantly. This may seem daunting for many candidates particularly those who have no experience of CBI. Clearly, it is important for any candidate to be prepared.

An effective technique to employ when answering competency based questions is the “STAR” method. It allows you to focus your thoughts and structure your responses in a clear and concise way. This means you can further impress the interviewer by getting in additional examples for one question. It enables you to showcase your ability and demonstrate your Unique Selling Points (USP)!

How to Do It…

Job Description and Person Specification

Scan the Job Description and Person Specification of the role, then list the key elements of the role and identify key words that encapsulate each of the “Essential” and “Desirable” criteria. Keep these as short as you can. Once you have a list, begin to identify situations/examples and structure your responses.

The STAR Model

Against each of the key words/elements you have identified try and think of 2 (or even 3!) situations when you have demonstrated ability in each area. Using these situations, structure your responses as follows: 

Situation Set the scene.   Explain the situation you encountered.   It is important for the interviewer to engage and relate to your answer. Examples that are relevant to your potential employer are highly recommended.
Task Explain what part/role you took in the situation.
Action Explain the action you took to address the situation / perform the task. Ensure you are speaking only about you and avoid using “we” here.
Results Explain the outcome of your action i.e. how your work resulted in a positive outcome.  Close the loop!

Create a Bank of Examples

Further reduce your stress by creating a “bank” of examples, evidencing how you successfully demonstrated different competencies. Remember to close one STAR example before introducing the next. (E.g.  “ … A further example of XXXXXXX was when. ..”  (next Situation).

Competency based questions are a fantastic way to showcase your abilities and convince the interviewer that you are the perfect candidate!

No job description yet? Do some initial work. Here are some key competencies for you to consider:

  • Planning and Organising
  • Decision making
  • Motivation
  • Effective Communication
  • Responsibility
  • Problem solving
  • Organisation
  • Leadership and Management
  • Using initiative
  • IT skills and packages

Good luck!

This guest post was written by Karen Chubb, Professional Development Coordinator at the University of Cumbria. 

Top five interview tips to help you land that job!

Interviews can be scary, especially if you have never had one before. The most important thing to do before any interview is to make sure that you are well prepared. Take some time before your interview to research the company, prepare answers to common interview questions, and make sure that you have everything you will need on the day to hand.

interview

Tip 1: Research the Company

Ideally you will already have done some research before applying for the role, but if not, now is the time to do it! You don’t have to memorise all of their annual reports or become an expert on their products, but if you haven’t done any research at all, it will reflect poorly on you during the interview. You should aim to know something about the products and services they provide as well as a brief overview of their history – you can also search for news articles about them, for added points.

Tip 2: Plan Ahead

You will normally be told in advance the location of the interview, so make the most of this advance knowledge and plan your route to get there. Being late for the interview means getting off on the wrong foot at best, and will have a strong negative impact on your chances of getting the job. Aim to arrive around 10 minutes before the time stated on your invite to interview. Build in time in your route for traffic jams, roadworks, public transport issues and so on. Take a spare copy of your CV with you, as well as the job description, your application, and some information on the company. Then when you arrive early, you can read through your pack while you are waiting.

Tip 3: First Impressions

When you arrive for your interview, make sure you switch off your mobile phone (or at the very least make sure it is on silent with the vibrate turned OFF). Take some mints or chewing gum to freshen your breath, but make sure you finish/dispose of it before going into the interview – you don’t want to be crunching mints or chewing gum in your interview!

Tip 4: Be Confident and Enthusiastic

Confidence is one the most important traits to creating a positive impression. Smile, be courteous and address the interviewers by name whenever possible. Keep in mind that you have already impressed the employer enough with your application/CV for them to want to see you. This is no small thing considering the volume of applications most employers receive. Therefore, you have already made a positive impression on them. Your task at the interview is to allow the employer to learn more about you and to see if they like your personality. This is hard to do if you clam up with nerves so take some deep breaths and try to relax.

Tip 5: Follow-Up To Your Interview

After your interview, write to the employer and thank them for their time in seeing you – do this if you are offered the job or not. This will make sure that you stick in their minds as a polite and proactive candidate, and will also confirm to the employer that you are still interested in the position. Sometimes you might need to check a fact or clarify a point raised during the interview. You can use the follow-up email or letter to relay this information to them.

Post adapted from http://www.jobcentreguide.co.uk/job-interview-tips/23/job-interview-tips

Highlight Your Job Specs!

Most people know that when writing job applications, it is vital to review two key documents – the job description and person specification – and that you ignore them at your peril. The terms are not used by all employers and employers are not legally obliged to provide them, but generally they need to form the basis of your applications.

Unless you are applying to smaller employers and have no more to go on than the text of an advert and your own research, you need to learn the art of reading between the lines of these key documents and responding to them appropriately. This is where it gets a bit more tricky.

Some of them tell you virtually nothing worth knowing about the post and you may be left feeling that they have only been written to satisfy company policy. But some are chock full of detail and use five times more words than you could ever hope to get into an application form. And some selection panels will definitely screen your application against a list of ‘essential’ and ‘desirable’ selection criteria drawn from the person spec.

At this point, one essential tool to help you separate the wood from the trees is – no, not an axe – but a highlighting pen. Here’s what to do next:

1) Take the ‘desc’ and the ‘spec’ plus any other details about the job you have collected and allow yourself the time to go through them all with a fine toothcomb – and a highlighting pen.

2) Try to get the feeling of the words and the energy they convey. Look for key phrases that tell you what the job is all about and the sort of person they are looking for. When you find one, highlight it. In the margin, add a few quick notes of situations where you used the skills or demonstrated the experience that the phrase indicates. These will be useful reminders when you start to draft your application.

3) Now of course there will be some phrases where you cannot think of any relevant information you can give. If so, do not despair. Highlight them anyway, perhaps in a different way so they stand out. If you come back to them later, it’s amazing how often that you will suddenly recall useful information that is exactly the evidence the employer is looking for – or, if not, something that is similar enough for you to use convincingly.

4) You may find there are some phrases that are used several times in the same documentation. These are likely to be major areas of interest to the employer that you need to write about at some length, using the STAR technique. Similarly, if you are applying for a number of jobs of the same kind, it can be worth noting that some employers mention requirements that others do not.

5) Once you have been through all the documentation, prioritise on the basis of your notes and the required length of the application:

  • things you must write about in detail
  • things you will at least mention
  • things you will only mention if there is space

6) Then put down the highlighting pen and pick up your mouse, laptop or black biro…

A Couple of Provisos

  • Don’t forget to say why you want to work for that company, even if they didn’t ask you to
  • If you really can’t think of any material that you can use to cover ‘essential’ criteria, don’t apply – the job probably isn’t for you.