Category Archives: networking

Summer Career Fix: Follow people in your sector

What are you doing this summer to help you stand out from the crowd?

Gary’s bags are packed and he’s ready to jet off to places far sunnier than Cumbria. But he’s not off for a lazy beach holiday – he’s going to be doing one small thing each week that will help in his future career. He doesn’t know what that career is just yet, but that’s ok – most of these things can be done even if you aren’t 100% sure what you want to do. And if you need some help finding your path, you can always email the Careers & Employability service for some advice and guidance: careers@cumbria.ac.uk

So what’s Gary doing this week?

He’s finding relevant people and organisations and following them on social media.

This is a really quick and easy way to improve your career prospects. Instead of mindlessly scrolling Twitter, do some searches to find influential people in your career sector. Follow them and try to get involved in conversations.

This will build up your commercial awareness skills – one of the most important graduate skills that employers look for. Commercial awareness is basically knowing what’s happening in your sector.

So for example if you are an Occupational Therapy student or graduate, search for local NHS trusts to follow, find out who are the influential voices of OT on social media, and also find out about any Twitter chats you can get involved in (#OTalk for example).

This will help when you start applying for jobs as you will have greater understanding of what’s happening in the sector and the important issues happening now.

Come back next week for another #SummerCareerFix 

Support is available from your Careers and Employability Service with career planning, CVs and applications, interview skills, practice interviews and more. Contact careers@cumbria.ac.uk with your careers queries.

Fancy a career in fashion? We’ve got tips from Urban Outfitters

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The fashion industry is notoriously difficult to break into, so gaining a little advice from someone who has already managed to do this can prove invaluable.

Sonia Aguado, the editorial copywriter at Urban Outfitters, has worked at several fashion retailers during her career and has given us some helpful tips on how to get your foot in the fashion door.  

sonia at urban outfitters

What is your background? How did you become an editorial copywriter?

After sixth form I went to UCA Epsom to study Fashion Journalism. At the time, I wasn’t 100% sure what I wanted to do, but I was interested in fashion and writing, so it was the perfect course for me.

After my first year, and having been exposed to so many areas of the industry I didn’t even know existed, I felt a bit like a lost puppy and didn’t know where my place in the industry would be.

During our second year, we were required to complete an internship – I interned with the press teams at New Look and ASOS and absolutely loved them. I then thought PR was what I wanted to do, but again, this changed.

After graduating, I worked part time at a small PR agency and didn’t enjoy it at all. At this point, one of my uni friends, who was a copywriter at ASOS, asked if I wanted to freelance with their team and I jumped at the chance; this was how I got into the world of copywriting.

 How did you find your job?

I got my job by knowing people in the industry and being in the right place at the right time. After I started freelancing at ASOS, another of my uni friends joined the team. She then got a job at Urban Outfitters as a copywriter, and when she was there she brought me in to freelance with them too.

I got to know the team really well and when the other copywriter announced she was leaving, I was put forward for the position. After being there for a few months, I was given the chance to become a junior editorial copywriter, instead of doing product copy, and from there I was promoted to editorial copywriter.

I think the best way to look for jobs in this field is by networking, freelancing, and getting to know people who could then put you forward for any roles that would suit you.

What do you enjoy the most about your job?

I enjoy the creativity that comes with my role, the people I work with, and working for a company that I loved before I was even a part of it.

What do you least enjoy about your job?

 We have deadlines to adhere to, but everything works in a chain reaction, so if one team is running behind with something, it then affects you and your work. Also, getting the dreaded writer’s block!

What takes up most of your time?

Writing copy for the website/the customer newsletter.

Are specific qualifications essential to work in your field? And if so, which ones?

A degree in fashion or writing is helpful, as well as experience in the area.

What skills and qualities are needed to be successful in your field?

Being able to write, attention to detail, proofreading skills, being able to work under pressure, and creativity!

Do you have any advice you could give to an aspiring graduate who is keen to get a foot on the ladder?

Make the most of your contacts and don’t underestimate the relationships you make at uni. The industry is very small and you end up knowing someone wherever you go. My friends at uni are the ones who put me forward for the roles I have had, and a recommendation is always going to be a lot more effective in getting you an interview than a cover letter that gets lost in someone’s inbox. Intern as much as you can and try to get some freelance work to build up your contacts.

Do you have any interview tips for a prospective applicant?

 Always research the company. Read their website, their blog, sign up to their newsletter, get to know their tone of voice, and get to know what they’re doing on social media etc. Have examples of your writing available, whether that’s a portfolio, a website or a blog.

If you would like to hear more about the career opportunities at Urban Outfitters, visit their careers page here.

 

 

Free Event: Social Enterprise Workshop

social enterprise event - networking

 

 

Want to have a positive social impact? Ever had an idea but not known where to start?

If the answer is yes, perhaps you should be thinking about starting your own social enterprise venture…

Unlike a business or corporation, social enterprise ventures are not profit driven; profits are usually reinvested into the organisation or community. The main goal of a social enterprise is to drive positive change; however this does not mean social enterprises are not financially successful. Social enterprises are businesses where society profits! There are many successful social enterprises in the UK and there’s more being brought to market every year.

If you have an interesting idea for a social enterprise and want to be an agent of change, we have the event for you!

On Tuesday 10th May at 2.00pm, we have a member of Manchester Metropolitan University’s Business School coming to the University of Cumbria to deliver a workshop about social entrepreneurship. The workshop will introduce students to social enterprise, motivate and inspire students to start their own ventures and will also act as a great networking platform (remember it’s all about who you know!). The event is two hours long, free to attend and will be held at the Fusehill Street campus in Carlisle.

Don’t worry if you don’t currently have any enterprising ideas, if you are interested in social enterprise you should still pop along to the Social Enterprise workshop. You never know, you may leave the event with an idea that could change your life; or more importantly – the lives of others.

We hope you can make it! Let’s help make the world a better place and drive positive change!

If you are interested in attending this event please book tickets through the following link; http://store.cumbria.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=1&catid=59&prodid=513

For more information please contact Ben Parker via email at ben.parker@cumbria.ac.uk

TEDx is coming to the University of Cumbria!

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TEDx, an independently organised TED event, is coming to Carlisle for one night only!

Tickets available on the UoC TEDx website here.

 

The Theme

For the first ever University of Cumbria TEDx event the theme ‘Progression’ has been chosen, this ties in nicely with university life and can have a broad interpretation. Expect talks on career progression, the progression of ideas and much more. The event speakers really have had some great ideas on what progression means to them and the world.

 

The Speakers:

  • Andy Beeforth – Chief Executive Cumbria Community foundation
  • Jacqui Filkins – Honoury Fellow, advisor to EU on health matters – Sustainability Strategies.
  • Brenda Crossley – Graduate – Aging & Adapting With Technology.
  • Nathan Roberts – Zoo Keeper – Conservation and Effective Communication.
  • Phillip Wilson – Musician. Making Music Accessible For All.
  • Annie Weir – Self-published creative writing graduate – Age Is Not A Barrier.

Developing a great line-up for this event has been tough, there are just so many talented people with great ideas! There will be something for everyone with six super talented speakers all with unique ideas to share from varied backgrounds. Be sure to check out the event blog here for updates on speakers with details about them and their talks.

 

When

Thursday 5th May 2016 at 18.30 until 21.30

 

Where

The event will be held in the University of Cumbria’s Fusehill Street campus close to the centre of Carlisle in the Learning Gateway Lecture Theatre.

University of Cumbria, Fusehill Street, Carlisle, CA1 2HH

 

Tickets

A ticket must be purchased to ensure attendance. Just to make it even harder to resist temptation you will get a free beer and a burger with each ticket. Now that’s food for thought…

Tickets are £8.49 per person (including booking fees)

Tickets available on the UoC TEDx website here.

 

 

About TEDx, x = independently organized event
In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TED Talks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized. (Subject to certain rules and regulations.)

Find out more on the TED website.

New to TED? Here’s 11 must see TED talks.

 

This event is being organised by Ben Parker (University of Cumbria Events Management Student)

 

Have you considered a graduate Internship?

Inspiring Interns

 

In the clamour to get graduate jobs after university, many graduates are left unable to make the career start they wanted to. Step in, graduate internships.

Rate My Placement define an internship as “a period of paid work experience between one and four months, usually taking place during the summer.” (RateMyPlacement, 2016).

However, not all graduate internships are like this. In fact internships after graduation not only give you the opportunity to gain valuable work experience in an industry you’re interested in, but will often lead to much longer term employment.

So what are the advantages of an internship after university?

A Graduate Job Afterwards

Recent High Fliers research suggests that amongst the UK’s top 100 graduate employers, almost a third expect to fill their graduate positions with people who have already interned specifically for that company. So while internships might appear to be a short term prospect, or simply an opportunity to gain experience, it could well secure you a full-time graduate job.

Get Experience

Of course, one of the main motivations to apply for internships is the opportunity to gain some work experience in a certain sector. As they are employing fresh graduates, many companies looking to hire an intern will provide a lot of training. As a result you’ll have the opportunity to gain experience in certain procedures and technical areas, as well as the type of soft skills you generally gain from being in a professional environment.

Build your Network

Doing an internship at a top company can also be a great way to build your business network. Even if you don’t secure a job afterwards, you can use it to establish relationships with certain people in the business as well as outside of it. They might not have a role available for you, but they may know someone who does. At the very least you’ll have a contact book who you can call on for advice or mentoring.

Not Sure What to do?

While internships are often seen as an opportunity for employers to assess candidates before they decide to hire them full time, this works both ways. If you’re unsure about exactly what area you want to go into, you can take a plunge into an internship in a sector you might be interested in working in and assess whether it’s right for you. As much as they have the option to not offer you a full-time job at the end, you’re not obligated to take an offer if it’s given.

Matt Arnerich is the content writer over at graduate recruitment agency Inspiring Interns, writing about all things graduate recruitment and graduate careers advice.

 

5 Common Regrets of University Graduates

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When a major life chapter comes to an end we often find ourselves in a state of reflection. What went well? What would I do differently, if I had the chance?

Ideally, we would soak up wisdom from those who have been there, done it and got the t-shirt and do things differently as a consequence.

This post by Francesca Turner is about just that! If you are a prospective or current university student then read on to find out what graduates are saying they would do differently if they could do it all over again.

1) Network more; we are all potential work colleagues

This is simply about getting to know the people you are studying with. They are quite possibly entering the same field of work as you and could help in the future by;

  • Introducing you to employers and job openings
  • giving you a personal recommendation on Linked In

That guy you don’t speak to in your Global Business module might be the CEO of that company you really want to work for in 10 years’ time. They won’t have a great impression of you if you blanked them for 3 years!

Plus, getting to know new people is actually fun! University is a chance to mix with people you might not normally meet and this often leads to lifelong friendships.

2) Spend more time with peers sharing good practice and learning from those with experience

 Many tasks in the real world require team-work so university is a great chance to learn about your strengths and developmental points in this area.

We all process information differently and a classmate might be able to describe Contemporary Social Theory to you perfectly in a way you understand, whilst you pick out holes in the arguments in their Human Rights essay.

Maybe one of your peers has relevant real life work experience in the field you are studying and could add a lot to your understanding of a topic area.

3) Get stuck into some voluntary work

Research shows that students are more engaged with their studies if they are applying knowledge alongside academic work.

Don’t worry if your course doesn’t include work experience as there are loads of volunteer opportunities out there (try www.do-it.org) and local companies are often happy to hear from students willing to offer their skills.

Even if you are unsure what you want to do in the future then any work experience which interests you can build your transferable skills, open you up to new career areas and provide you with a bank of examples for interview situations.

4) Realise what a privilege it is to be able to study a subject you love

Many students report they feel that they rushed through their degree’s and wished they had taken more time enjoying their subject.

Only once the experience was over did they wish they had viewed their degree as a chance to read a subject they loved rather than a means to an end.

Think about the following (avoiding career/ salary related reasons) and write down your thoughts;

  • why did you choose your subject?
  • what do you love about it?

Pin it up somewhere you can see it every day. This can help you re-connect with your subject and reignite your passion.

5) Find out which support services are available

Many students report they discovered these when it was too late but recognised thier value.

Services usually on offer are;

  • careers and enterprise
  • disability
  • study skills
  • health and wellbeing
  • counselling

A search online on your university website will provide you with further information and contact details.

 Reflections

  • If you are a graduate what would you do differently if you could have your time again?
  • Current students- has this changed your perspective in any way?

UoCCareers

5 Common Regrets of University Graduates

Friday’s Featured Vacancy: Associate Recruitment Consultant

If you are a confident person, have sales skills and can communicate well with people, this could be a career you would enjoy. In this job you will need to be a good negotiator. You will also need to be organised, professional and enjoy working towards targets.

Metis Human Capital Graduate Scheme 2016

Our goal is to support your growth so that you can establish yourself as a confident consultant with Metis Human Capital in six months. We offer an in-depth training scheme that will allow you to progress from the classroom to a mentored seamless integration into your team. You will be taught about the financial service’s market, your specialist area(s), typical sales structure and the candidate side of the recruitment process. There will be additional client based training to develop your skills to influence and negotiate, pitching for PSL’s and develop new client relationships. Once you have graduated from our academy we will continue to support your career development to help meet our mutual goals.

Desired skills

  • Graduate level education.
  • Focus and self-motivated.
  • Ability to demonstrate strong networking and presentation skills.
  • Other language skills would be an advantage.
  • Sales experience is desirable but not essential.

Role Benefits

  • £20k-£22k annual salary + commission.
  • £35k OTE year one.
  • Market leading commission of up to 40%.
  • Structured career path.
  • Ongoing training and development.
  • International opportunities.
  • Quarterly and annual prizes for achievements including overseas vacation.

Apply via

www.metishumancapitalcareers.co.uk 

Job Type: Full-time
Salary: £35,000.00 /year