Category Archives: part-time work

Finding part-time work #JobShop Pop-ups

If you are looking for a part-time or seasonal job you can ‘pop’ along to our Job Shop Pop-ups, taking place over the 2 weeks of welcome week. Dates are:

Ambleside: Wednesday 20 September, 10.30am-12.30pm in the Barn

Brampton Road, Carlisle: Tuesday 26 September, 11.00am-1.00pml in The Works (refectory)

Lancaster: Tuesday 26 September, 11.30am-1.30pm in the Gateway building

Fusehill Street, Carlisle: Thursday 28 September, 11.00am-1.00pm in the Learning Gateway

Don’t worry if you can’t make it to one of the pop-ups, as we also have a handy guide that you can download HERE!

 

Support is available from your Careers and Employability Service with career planning, CVs and applications, interview skills, practice interviews and more. Contact careers@cumbria.ac.uk with your careers queries.

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Friday Featured Opportunity: part-time tutoring in Cumbria

tutors needed

Cumbria Clever Tutors is a professional provider of private one-to-one home tutors in a range of school based and professional study subjects in the Cumbria area, which includes Carlisle, Penrith, Workington, Cockermouth, Whitehaven, Kendal and the surrounding area. They are looking for tutors in a wide range of disciplines including:  Science, mathematics, English and other related subjects, and would like to hear from post-graduate students to tutor  across all levels from primary to GCSE and A-level and above.

They are looking for degree qualified people with an interest in teaching, tutoring and helping others with a passion for their subject, to deliver one-to-one tuition within various towns across Cumbria. The candidate will be degree qualified with some experience either in tutoring, teaching, mentoring, supervising, lecturing, training, or generally helping others to succeed in life. You will need to be available during or  after school hours and some weekdays.  It would be helpful if you had your own transportation to travel to pupils/students homes in the areas listed above.   However, you can offer private tuition in your own home if you choose. You will need an enhanced DBS (formerly known as a CRB)and if you do not have one you will need to cover the cost of acquiring one, although we can initiate the process for you.

The benefits are as follows: they provide part-time work on a self employed basis with a very good level of remuneration (minimum of £20-00 per hour), together with insurance cover whilst working on our behalf. This is a brilliant opportunity for the right candidates to get involved within the educational sector and really make a difference for pupils and students looking for help. PLEASE CALL DR ALAN WATSON ON 01900 608211. or E-MAIL CUMBRIA@CLEVERTUTORS .COM

Featured vacancy: National Citizen Service seasonal summer staff still needed for Cumbria and Lancashire

insira

Could you lead, inspire and mentor a small group of 15-17 year olds through a life-changing experience? Inspira are recruiting a large number of seasonal summer staff for their Summer NCS programme – a groundbreaking, action-packed, personal development programme enabling young people to challenge their limits, develop new skills and discover the satisfaction of doing good in their own communities.

Summer staff are the essential ingredient in the NCS recipe – they are the ones that elevate their programme out of the ordinary, ensuring that every member of their team of young people has an experience of a lifetime. If you are a confident, enthusiastic, motivated self-starter who enjoys working with young people, this is an opportunity not to be missed.

This isn’t just another job vacancy – this is a chance to go on a personal development journey of your own and have a hand in shaping the leaders of tomorrow.

Opportunities exist for Team Leaders and Team Assistant to work across North, South and West Cumbria and areas of Lancashire.  These roles are suitable for people who are available for paid work for varying periods of time during summer 2017 and who are looking for opportunities for training and development.  Various dates for work are available from 26th June 2017 onwards.

Working with groups of young people, both residentially and in the local community, you will be responsible for the pastoral care, behaviour management and support needs of your allocated group of young people.  You will facilitate and support activities whilst inspiring and assisting in the participants’ personal development through the residential and community focused elements of the NCS programme.

Job Ref:         037
Job Title:       NCS Summer Staff
Salary:           £957 – £1280 + food and accommodation for 3 weeks work
Location:       Cumbria and Lancashire

Closing date: please get your applications to us as soon as possible.  Selection centres will be held on 22nd April and 6th May 2017.

This post is subject to an enhanced DBS Check.

For further details, and to apply, go to www.inspira.org.uk/jobs

Looking for a part-time casual job? Does your CV fit the bill?

2 bar work Are you looking for a part-time job in a shop, bar or restaurant? Dropping off your CV in person and asking to speak to the manager can be an effective strategy.  First impressions really count, particularly if you are dressed appropriately and you come across as confident, personable and enthusiastic.  A prospective employer will be impressed by your initiative and motivation too.

It’s a good idea to have a CV that you can leave with them. Even if they don’t have a vacancy at the time, you can always ask to be kept on file and you may well find that you get a phone call out of the blue.

However, don’t leave them your main graduate CV. Create a different shorter version that fits the type of employer you are targeting.

Here are some tips about what to leave out and what you should be emphasising instead.

  • Make sure your CV is easy to follow and looks professional. Don’t overcrowd with too much text and don’t make it any longer than one or two sides of A4.
  • Make sure your contact details are obvious. Your contact telephone numbers and email need to be clearly stated at the top of your CV.
  • Remember what you want your CV to do for you! Make it obvious who you are eg a reliable and hard-working student seeking a part-time job in a customer facing role. Write a short personal profile (no more than 50 words) that states clearly what you can offer and what you want.
  • Put your work experience section before your academic one. It’s always a good idea on a CV to position each section in order of importance for the type of job you want. So after a short personal profile, a section describing your work experience will be of more interest to a pub manager for example than details about your degree subject. For graduate jobs, the order will be different, as your academic background is likely to be your ‘main selling point’.
  • Make sure your relevant work experience is clearly stated and easy to find. If you have relevant experience, mention this in your profile, and then expand on it more fully in a section called ‘work experience’.
  • What does a prospective employer want from a student seeking a part-time job in a bar/shop/café etc? Use phrases and words that resonate with the hospitality and retail sector. A prospective employer will want to know that you ‘enjoy dealing with customers’ or ‘know how to create a welcoming friendly atmosphere’, or ‘have the tact and diplomacy to deal with demanding customers’, ‘have a flexible approach to work’ etc
  • Only include relevant information. Reduce or even leave out completely complex detail about your degree course and subject specialisms. A busy shop manager doesn’t have the time to read about your dissertation choice or course modules for example. It may even put them off! You can mention what you are studying and where (eg Accounting and Finance student) but give this less prominence than you would give to it on your graduate CV.
  • Demonstrate that you have the skills needed to work in a shop/bar etc. Position your ‘employment section’ after your ‘personal profile’ and expand on any part-time paid or voluntary jobs you have had previously. Use bullet points to describe duties and responsibilities such as handling money, preparing and serving food/drinks, helping customers find the goods they want. This shows that you could potentially hit the ground running.
  • Promoting your transferable skills and personal qualities. If you have no previous work experience, then promote your transferable skills and personal attributes that demonstrate your suitability and employability. For example, that you get on well with people and can work well in a team; that you are reliable and responsible, confident and articulate. Mention extra-curricular activities that might show off your people and team-working skills.

If you haven’t had a part-time job before, then taking the plunge and making a speculative visit really could pay off. People respond to people, and if you are charming, friendly and smart, you could just be what they are looking for.

Finally don’t forget the careers team can support you with CV writing and looking for jobs. Contact us on  careers@cumbria.ac.uk

 

 

 

 

#UoCMedia Industry Day: Why Work Experience is Important and How to Get It

 

media city 2

There are many ways to gain relevant work experience in the media industry and they don’t all involve traveling to London!

I recently represented the University of Cumbria at a BBC Digital and Creative Careers Day at Media City in Salford. One of the biggest things I took from the day is the need for graduates applying for training schemes, jobs and freelance work to have relevant work experience.

 

How much experience should I have?

As a current student or recent graduate you are not expected to have years of experience in the sector you want to work in. Instead, you need to demonstrate that you are committed and interested in working in your intended field. You can do this by attending relevant work experience, reflecting on what you have learned and asking for a letter of recommendation from the employers you work for.

Work experience opportunities can range for a day’s shadowing, a week or two, a few months or a longer-term internship. With such a wide variety of opportunities available it is important to focus on the quality and relevance of a work experience placement rather than the amount of placements you do.

 

How to get relevant work experience:

  • Send a CV and covering letter to companies and ask for shadowing/work experience
  • Make your own content
  • Volunteer for university or community radio and TV
  • Apply for advertised work experience

 

It’s all about the money…

Some work experience opportunities will be paid, others may not be. If you are planning to take part in unpaid work experience I suggest deciding (before you apply) under what circumstances you will work for free and for how long.

Think about: what benefits you will receive, what skills and experiences you will gain, if you have done the same thing or something similar already, how much it will cost you, when you are available, if you can get funding and how it will benefit your career.

When thinking about if you should take part in an unpaid placement consider:

  • Are you being asked to do work that you would usually be paid for?
  • When you are on placement are you doing the same work as paid staff members and are you being given responsibility for work?
  • Are you being asked to take on an unpaid placement for more than 6 weeks?

If the answer to any of the above is yes the placement offered should be a paid one.

Note – we know it can sometimes be difficult to judge whether a work experience placement should be paid or not. If you are unsure you can e-mail careers@cumbria.ac.uk for advice.

 

I have included a list of work experience opportunities below and some information on the upcoming Media Industry Day on Wednesday 13 April 2016.

 

Good Luck!

Kathryn Jones

Careers and Employability Coordinator

University of Cumbria

Careers and Employability Service

 

 

#UoCMedia Industry Day

Wednesday 13 April 2016 – 9am to 4.15pm – Brampton Road Campus (registration at main reception)

Find more information here – https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/media-industry-day-tickets-23238632375?platform=hootsuite

Registration has now closed but UoC students are welcome to just come along on the day.

 

 

Media Careers – Work Experience Opportunities:

 

BBC Work Experience

There are four application windows every year and each one will last two weeks.

Various Locations

www.bbc.co.uk/careers

 

ITV Insight

There are four windows of opportunity to apply each year, with the Insight Programme open in January, April, July and October.

Various locations

www.itvjobs.com

 

Discover Wildlife Magazine

BBC Wildlife welcomes work experience students for a period of one week throughout the year.

www.discoverwildlife.com/work-experience

 

C4 Pop Up Events

C4 Pop Up is a day of industry talks, creative workshops and down to earth careers advice and support from Channel 4. Dates for the London, Belfast and Cardiff events are already up with more to follow.

http://4talent.channel4.com/4talent-days

 

Event Volunteer Quays Festival 2016

Quays Culture – North West England

Deadline – 30 June 2016

www.artsjobs.org.uk

 

Volunteer Venue Assistants and Festival Runners

Bradford Literature Festival – Yorkshire

Deadline – 6 May 2016

www.artsjobs.org.uk

 

Event Steward

Wild Rumpus – Staffordshire

Deadline – 18 April 2016

www.artsjobs.org.uk

 

Treasurer

Lake District Summer Music – Cumbria

Deadline 25 May 2016

www.artsjobs.org.uk

 

Volunteer media opportunities at the Animal Refuge and Carlisle Youth Zone

Cumbria

Contact Max Evans-Kirkman – mekmedia@outlook.com

 

Mullholland Media

Cumbria

Contact David Mulholland (Company Director) for potential work experience opportunities

david@mulhollandmedia.co.uk

07770 676766 / 07879 444443

www.mulhollandmedia.co.uk

www.monsteraerial.com

 

Cloudscape Studios

Cumbria

Contact Lou Kneath Gibson (Company Director) to find out more

lou@cloudscapestudios.com

07521 295534

www.cloudscapestudios.com

 

 

Useful Contacts

 

Careers and Employability Service

Contact us for CV, application and personal statement feedback, careers appointments, career planning, help finding placements and graduate jobs.

www.cumbria.ac.uk/careers

careers@cumbria.ac.uk

 

Student Enterprise

If you are thinking about starting your own business, whether it’s for profit or not, we can help and support you all the way.

01228 888734

Sylvia.grainger@cumbria.ac.uk

www.cumbria.ac.uk/studententerprise

 

Friday’s Featured Vacancies – 06/03/2015

2 Summer positions available at FatFace Ambleside:  

1 x 8 hour temporary position beginning April to September – must be available Sunday to Wednesday

1 x 8 hour temporary position beginning April to September – must be available Thursday to Saturday

Please take a CV into the store before the closing date of Monday 16 March 2015. 

Fat Face, Market Cross, Ambleside, Cumbria LA22 9BT Tel: 015394 33376

 

Bar Staff and Waitress positions at FINO, Ambleside

Part time staff required for small upmarket wine bar in the heart of Ambleside. Applicants must have an excellent customer manner, be reliable, trustworthy and hard working. Previous experience would be an advantage but training can be given to the right candidate.

Apply online here: http://www.indeed.co.uk/cmp/FINO/jobs/Bar-Staff-Waitress-4498a8042b2c9c0b

 

Waiter positions at Apple Pie Eating House and Bakery, Ambleside

We have a vacancy for a waiter in our busy café/bakery in Ambleside.  Experience preferred but full training will be given. No shift work.  Starting rate £6.50 but after initial training this can be reviewed. We are looking for someone energetic and outgoing, who has an interest in Customer service. Accommodation available for the right applicant. Full and part time positions available.

Applications to: Simon Carter, Rydal Road, Ambleside, LA22 9AN
Phone: 015394 33679
Email: info@applepieambleside.co.uk

Building a Portfolio Career

Today’s guest post is from Sam Curran, an alumni of the University of Cumbria. Today Sam is talking about portfolio careers. Take it away, Sam!

SamCurran-CareerAhead

When you graduate, it can be quite a tough thing to consider what you want to do with your life. There are numerous routes and avenues which graduates explore. Some want to head for the stars and travel, whilst others may even go into a field that their degree is not to do with. Then there are people like me who want a portfolio career.

A portfolio career is where you do not have one fixed job, instead carrying out a number of roles, which could be completely unrelated to each other. It could be 2 or 3 things or for some people their repertoire can stretch to doing more than 5 jobs, which is quite astounding. Quite different from the normal 9 till 5 grind, which can put people into a routine which may not be good for them, although there is a clear division between work and play, which a portfolio career does not really allow for.

I think I have always known that I wanted to do different things in life although it is something that may take me a little time to get the correct balance. Building a portfolio career initially can be pretty tough as you try and put things in place but it does get easier over time. Some people may have the impression that a portfolio career involves doing all freelance work, but this is not strictly true. I think in the future it will probably involve a mixture of freelance and part time work hopefully in a school for me or maybe somewhere else. Things take time to come to fruition and all great things are worth waiting for I suppose.

You have to build up your skills in certain areas first and learn the ropes as well. It also involves having the ability to work on your own, something which I found hard at first, but not anymore as I actually enjoy the quiet and relaxation and I feel a lot better about things now. Hopefully I will enjoy all the things in my burgeoning portfolio career which are at the moment: proofreading, writing, tutoring (maybe some teaching), casual youth work and maybe being a counselor in the future. I think a mixture of things in life keeps things interesting – at least it does for me! Even within the things that I do I like variety – such as writing: I write essays, blog posts and I am even writing my own book at the moment about how I got free from a mental illness. At least at the start having a portfolio career is quite tough as you start to build your life and put things in place. However, things get easier over time as your abilities improve. You learn new skills and you get more opportunities as well.

I have definitely become more resilient as well in building my portfolio career as I have finally learned to work on my own, which is something I have struggled with in the past. It can be quite a solitary pursuit with some of the work I do although I imagine that as I build more things into my life that involve people and get a balance of being on my own and with people then things will improve. Actually I am comfortable being on my own now and quite like that. That said, it is nice to get out of the house though. Sometimes I wish I had the opportunity to go and work somewhere else. When I lived in Lancaster I frequently used the twenty four hour library and it was great, I could just go there whenever I felt like it and quite enjoyed myself, regardless of whether people were there or not. It gave me somewhere to go, a definitive place to go each day where I knew I could get out of the house.

I now live in Darlington in the North East and there is nowhere here that quite has the facilities that the library in Lancaster does, but I am going to move somewhere different in the future, hopefully with a place to go to do my work and plenty of other opportunities as well.

The key to a good life is balance, variety and eradicating all the negative thoughts that you get. I have even started practicing mindfulness which means you stay in the present moment more, something which has allowed me to enjoy life more. I would recommend a portfolio career to anyone. It might be hard at first, but it certainly is going to be worth it in the end.

By Sam Curran

Sam has his own proofreading business. He charges from £3.00 per 1,000 words. He can help with style and content as well as grammatical and formatting issues. Sam has proofread for 6 years and has proofread pieces of work from Undergraduate to PHD level as well as editing CVs, job applications and personal statements. The business has its own Facebook page ‘Efficient Editing’ which you can contact Sam through. You can also get in touch with Sam by emailing him at samcurran@live.co.uk