Category Archives: teaching

Friday’s Featured Vacancy: Be More – Be a Teacher (Teach Kent)

Doing what you love outside the classroom can shape you as a teacher inside the classroom, what is your passion and could you turn it into a career in teaching? You’re an artist, a triathlete, a performer, a rugby player but above all, you are a teacher.

Kent Teach have opportunities for NQTs from across the country to teach in Kent – take a look at their video below, or visit https://www.kent-teach.com/Be-a-Teacher to find out more.

Be More. Be a Teacher.

Education Resources and Conference

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So you graduated with an Education related degree, but haven’t landed a job yet? Worry not! 

The Careers and Employability Service have loads for resources for you:

First of all: a guide to finding your first teaching job: Finding your first teaching job (PDF)

Applying for teaching jobs: Advice on Writing your CV (PDF)Writing a letter or personal statement (PDF) and top tips on acing your interview (PDF)

Not sure where you want to work? Here’s some information about different types of school: Types of school (PDF)

Congratulations! You landed a job! Here’s everything you need to know about Your NQT induction year (PDF)

Don’t fancy a permanent job? Have you considered supply work? Pros and Cons of Supply Work (PDF)

Don’t want to be a teacher? Here are some alternatives to teaching (PDF) as well as the more comprehensive AGCAS Education alternatives (2015) (PDF).

As part of our annual Education Conference, there will be an employer fair where you can meet various employers from the education sector. These will take place on Monday 17 October in Lancaster (11.30am-2.30pm in the Old Dining Hall), and on Tuesday 18 October in Carlisle (11.00am-2.00pm in the Learning Gateway, Fusehill Street).

Good luck, and remember that the Careers and Employability service is here for you, even after you graduate. Email careers@cumbria.ac.uk to find out more.

 

The pros and cons of working as a supply teacher

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If you are struggling to secure a permanent teaching post, there is always the option of working as a supply teacher.  But how does it all work and what are the advantages and disadvantages?

Most supply work is advertised by teaching recruitment agencies that specialise in education. However some schools and local authorities recruit supply teachers directly, so if there is a particular school or local authority in which you wish to work, it’s worth contacting them speculatively.

Agencies (sometimes called Recruitment Consultants) are commercial organisations ranging from large national and international companies, to small local firms. Some cover a range of sectors and some specialise solely in education. The agency is paid a fee by the school for their recruitment services. The prospective employee pays no fees.

Supply teachers are employed either via supply teaching agencies, umbrella companies, or directly by schools, local authorities and academies. An umbrella company acts as an employer to supply teachers and will usually pass on to the teacher various costs such as the employer’s National Insurance contributions and the umbrella company’s fee.

Registration with an agency usually involves submitting an application form or CV, followed by a meeting with one of their recruitment agents or consultants. Whilst there is no guarantee of regular work, supply teachers who can adapt quickly and at short notice to different schools, pupils, subjects and age groups will be in more demand than those who are less flexible.

NQTs often ask how working as a supply teacher effects the requirement to complete an induction or probationary year.  The rules currently state that from the point of award of QTS you can undertake short-term supply work of less than one term in a relevant school for a maximum period of 5 yearswithout a completed NQT induction year. This is a fixed time limit with no discretion to extend. Short-term supply placements of less than one term, or equivalent, cannot count towards induction. Once the 5 years is up you will need to take a post that counts towards your NQT induction year. For more information on your induction year, have a look at the government’s guidance document.

UOC careers service can help you put together a teaching CV, and advise you on agencies to approach. We always suggest you choose an agency which specialises in teaching, and more specifically supply work. It’s also worth checking that they belong to the Recruitment and Employment Confederation (REC). If an agency uses the REC logo, it means that they have passed the initial Compliance Test and required to adhere to the REC Code of Professional Practice.

Are there advantages working as a supply teacher rather than gaining a permanent contract?

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Flexibility, freedom and variety

You can choose whether to accept or decline work.

You can work in a variety of different settings and locations.

Not being tied to a permanent contract means you can take holidays in term time, when travel is cheaper!

You can combine working with learning. For example, undertake a part-time Masters degree at the same time.

Professional development and employment prospects

stock-photo-teacher-helping-young-boy-with-writing-lesson-107801354You get to experience different ways of doing things which is great for picking up new ideas and developing confidence and expertise.

You get to experience different settings which will broaden your horizons.

You are more likely to secure a permanent contract if you have been working as a supply teacher than if you are unemployed or working in a non-teaching role.

Networking

First impressions really count, and as you’ll meet a range of teachers and head teachers, there will be lots of opportunities to network.

Build your reputation! Head teachers network with each other too, so if you are good, word spreads.

“Try before you buy”

Get an insight into different schools and decide which setting suits you best.

If you are relocating to a new area, supply work gives you the chance to get a feel for different communities and schools in the new area.

Autonomy

As a supply teacher you will tend to do less of the onerous daily planning and preparation that permanent teachers are expected to do.

You may not attend as many meetings as permanent teaching staff.

What are some of the  disadvantages?

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Financial insecurity

Some supply teachers get plenty of work, but some don’t.

The lack of a regular income can be problematic if you wish to apply for a mortgage.

 

Terms and conditions of employment may vary depending on the nature of your contract and employment status.

Irregular work

The availability of work can be irregular if you are an NQT.

Being called upon at the last minute can be stressful. If you say ‘no’ and turn work down, you may worry that you may not be called upon again.

It’s difficult to forward plan as you may or may not be working.

Not belonging

It can be lonely being a supply teacher as colleagues don’t always have time to get to know you properly.

Support

Access to continuing professional development and mentoring support can be irregular.

If you are only working in a school for a short time, it can be difficult to get to know the children and therefore not as easy to teach them.

 

Sources of advice and support

The University of Cumbria Careers and Employability Service is here to support you for up to three years after you complete your course – http://www.cumbria.ac.uk/careers. Email careers@cumbria.ac.uk to book an appointment and for advice on applications, CVs and more.

Careers can also give you feedback via email on your teaching applications, letters and CVs. Send us the job details of the post you are applying for, and your draft application, letter or CV and we’ll email back some feedback.

 

 

 

To teach or not to teach…

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I’ve been advising quite a few Primary Education students recently who are coming to the end of their initial teacher training and are now uncertain about whether to continue on a teaching career path.  Teaching is a hugely rewarding profession, but it can be tough and is not for everyone.  It’s also perfectly normal to have a change of heart and want to change direction.

The good news is that there are lots of alternatives career paths to consider and some very useful information online.  If you are reading this, and have doubts too about whether teaching is right for you, the following articles and guides may well give you some inspiration. Don’t forget too that you can come and talk to us in UoC Careers.  Email us on careers@cumbria.ac.uk to make an appointment.

In the meantime, here are some useful resources that we refer students to and which may give you some inspiration!

Education Alternatives. This AGCAS publication (the Association of Graduate Careers Advisory Services) is probably the most comprehensive resource for students who are still interested in education generally, but don’t want to work in a school as a classroom teacher.  The guide has been written by a team of experienced university careers advisers and covers two main pathways:  roles which involve teaching, but not in mainstream education; and roles within the broader education sector.

For a lighter read, Target Jobs has a useful article called ‘Alternative careers in education’. Their options include training and development, careers and education guidance, family support and advocacy, and adult and community education.

You may of course need to boost your career chances with a further qualification at diploma or post graduate level. Some options for further training or postgraduate qualifications which you can add to your initial teacher training are covered on Target Jobs.

For general research, Prospects has a list of Job profiles which you can browse by sector or job title. Each job role is profiled and gives some useful factual information about the qualifications, skills and experience needed. The National Careers Service’s Job Profiles is a good resource too, and has interesting job market information.

Finally, remember you will have developed a whole range of useful transferable skills all of which will be relevant to other careers. If you need some help identifying these, don’t forget you can contact Careers at careers@cumbria.ac.uk

 

 

Alumni Spotlight: Abigail Ede

Abigail Ede, Class of 2010, PGCE Early Years

Abigail EdeAbigail is a year 1 class teacher at the Nord Anglia School in Dubai. Her teaching career has taken her from the UK, to Beijing, now to Dubai and next onto Hong Kong! Rightfully proud she says, “I’ve achieved my ambitions and have a fantastic lifestyle full of interesting people and fantastic opportunities to see the world.”

If Abigail hadn’t come to Carlisle she would most likely be living and working in her home town in Wales. She chose the University of Cumbria because of its location in a most beautiful part of the world and the quality of the course, where she learnt from teaching professionals and had a fantastic experience – meeting her now best friends along the way.

Training to teach has been one of the best decisions she has ever made. “It felt good to have a qualification that allowed me to go on to earn good money and get a job straight away.” Abigail’s hopes for the future include becoming a part of the leadership team in her school and to start up a story-telling business with a fellow teacher.

What are you up to now?

Have you got an exciting new job, working on a new project, want everyone to know about your own business, had something published or exhibited? Perhaps you are getting married or had a baby? Whatever your news, we would love to hear about it and share it with your fellow alumni. Visit our share your experiences page to download the profile form if you would like to be included in the next edition of Aluminate or just email us.

Alumni Spotlight: Nathalie Grobe

Nathalie Grobe, Class of 1996, PGCE Secondary French

Natalie GrobeOriginally from France, Nathalie secured a place at St. Martin’s College through the Erasmus programme with an ambition to teach in the UK. Now employed at the French International School in Hong Kong as a French teacher, Nathalie has travelled and taught all over the world.

Crediting her PGCE with changing her life she says, “the qualification gave me the chance to do what I love, travelling and teaching in great schools.”

She has never looked back after deciding to leave to UK to teach internationally and states, “it was the best choice ever. Teaching is the best job to have when you are travelling as it is easier to find work. I am most proud of being able to combine a family and work life balance – my job has taken me to places many people only ever dream of.”

What are you up to now?

Have you got an exciting new job, working on a new project, want everyone to know about your own business, had something published or exhibited? Perhaps you are getting married or had a baby? Whatever your news, we would love to hear about it and share it with your fellow alumni. Visit our share your experiences page to download the profile form if you would like to be included in the next edition of Aluminate or just email us.

Alumni Spotlight: Sarah Johnston

Sarah Johnston, Class of 2013, Primary Education with QTS

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Originally from Carlisle, self-confessed “home-bird” Sarah had only one choice on her uni applications: the University of Cumbria to study primary teaching at the Fusehill Street campus in Carlisle.

“I had heard good things about the course and was made-up when I got in.”

Sarah has wanted to be a primary teacher for as long as she can remember and is very proud to have achieved her dreams. Now a full-time long-term supply teacher, covering a maternity leave at lovely village school Great Corby. “I honestly don’t think I would be happy in any other career, I love how rewarding it is and how every day is different.”

Sarah credits the University of Cumbria and the teaching course with changing her life “absolutely definitely” for the better, it is here where she grew in confidence and met some amazing life-long friends. Looking back Sarah recalls, “There were loads of funny stories from uni. Most teachers are up for anything fun, and always enjoy acting like big kids. Nobody likes a boring teacher!”

Sarah’s proudest moments in teaching so far are when she sees the kids in her class truly enjoying their work or when she receives feedback from parents to let her know they have repeated an activity done in class at home. Sarah’s ambitions for the future are to continue learning and improving, “to teach as well as the experienced teachers I have observed.”

What are you up to now?

Have you got an exciting new job, working on a new project, want everyone to know about your own business, had something published or exhibited? Perhaps you are getting married or had a baby? Whatever your news, we would love to hear about it and share it with your fellow alumni. Visit our share your experiences page to download the profile form if you would like to be included in the next edition of Aluminate or just email us.