Tag Archives: Social media

Trials and tribulations of Thursdays Top Tips

Hello everyone, for weeks I have been trying to launch a mini video series that I will dub Thursdays Top Tips. This is in a bid to give a more personal presentation for some of our information. I personally had a chunk of time off and wasn’t able to actual film the clips ready to use before my holiday so that has delayed the efforts somewhat, I apologise. If you follow our Instagram you will have seen that I had said I will be introducing this soon.

After returning I filmed the intro and first episode ready to upload but have then hit odd roadblocks in trying to post it out for you guys. As the original idea was to have these on Instagram we tried to keep them short just as 30 sec – 1 minute videos which I’ve seen before on Instagram (Video 1 the introduction was 43seconds and video 2 the first episode about My Career Enriched was 31seconds these times include the titlecards/splashcreens I was using). But it wouldn’t let me upload them from either to Instagram or Facebook via the sites directly or the social media manager we use. I have checked file types and sizes which should be useable but still get an error message when trying to upload them and this has been attempted with both the raw video file and my edited version where I’ve trimmed the start and end of the clip as well as adding a title card.

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Picture of the thumbnail and title card I was trying to use

I also went to find a PC designed for video editing so that I could use adobe premiere to trim and edit certain parts and convert it form a .mov to .mpeg4 even through Facebook says it accepts both formats I attempted to eliminate this potential issue. Via premiere and media encoder I cut down the file size as well, although again checking what you can upload this was well within a usable range. I still had no luck in uploading, at this point it had been attempted directly from the iPhone, my workstation and the editing suite still with no luck.  It has allowed me to upload it to my personal Facebook page but not the Careers Page.

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My Workstation

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The Video editing Suite

On a side note whilst using the video uploader in Facebook I also played around with adding subtitles, although the auto generated ones didn’t quite work manually typing them in was easy enough once I got the hang of it. If I do find out how to get the videos up I will aim to utilise this feature so the videos are more accessible.

I might have to scrap the video idea and just present this information with images.

But: What’s your opinion? Should I keep trying to get the videos up? Have I overlooked an obvious fix?

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Building a Great Student Profile on Linked-in

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Currently the most popular social media recruitment platform with at least 80% of employers saying that they use it to find and attract candidates,  LinkedIn also has lots of career and job seeking tips too.  Here is their advice specifically aimed at students on how to tackle the difficult business of writing a LinkedIn profile.

  1. Write an informative profile headline.

Your headline is a short, memorable professional slogan. For example,

“Honours student seeking marketing position.” Check out the profiles of students and recent alumni you admire for ideas.

2. Pick an appropriate photo.

LinkedIn isn’t Facebook. Upload a high-quality photo (your profile will be 7x more likely to be viewed) of yoprofile pictureu alone, professionally dressed. No party shots, cartoon avatars, or puppy pics!

 

 

3. Show off your education.

Include all your schools, major(s) and minor, courses, and study abroad or summer programs.

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4. Develop a professional Summary.

Your Summary statement is like the first few paragraphs of your best-written cover letter — concise and confident about your qualifications and goals. Include relevant work and extracurricular activities.

5. Fill “Skills & Expertise” with keywords.

This section is the place to include keywords and phrases that recruiters search for. Find relevant ones in job listings that appeal to you and profiles of people who have the kinds of roles you want.

6. Update your status regularly.

Posting updates helps you stay on your network’s radar and build your professional image. Mention your projects, professional books or articles, or events you’re attending. Many recruiters read your feed!

7. Show your connectedness.

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Groups you join appear at the bottom of your profile. Joining some shows that you want to engage in professional communities and learn the lingo. Start with your university and industry groups.

8. Collect diverse recommendations.

The best profiles have at least one recommendation for each position a person has held. Recruiters are most impressed by recommendations from people who have directly managed you.

9. Claim your unique LinkedIn URL.

To increase the professional results that appear when people search for you online, set your LinkedIn profile to “public” and create a unique URL (e.g., www.linkedin.com/in/JohnSmith).

10. Share your work.

You can also add actual examples of your writing, design work, or other accomplishments on your profile, where you can share rich media or documents. What better way to sell your skills than to show employers exactly what you can produce?https://university.linkedin.com/content/dam/university/global/en_US/site/pdf/TipSheet_BuildingaGreatProfile.pdf

 

Why is social media so important to your present and future career?

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Whether you are currently seeking a job or you are already employed it is vital that you ensure that your social media is fully private and that you understand the distinction between personal and professional.

People are now inviting their clients, colleagues and professional contacts onto their social media, which was something that was rare in the past.

If you are looking for employment you should give off the right impression on social media if you choose to keep it open to everybody.

A recent study by Jobvite found that 90% of employers use LinkedIn as part of their initial search for new talent. This is hardly surprising considering that LinkedIn is a social site for professional use. The scariest statistic is that two thirds of the survey admitted to checking Facebook before hiring, whilst over half (54%) admitted to checking your tweets!

To make sure that you are on the safe side here’s the top five tips for staying professional online and cleaning up your digital footprint:

Maximise your privacy

If you are using Facebook for personal use make sure that you have your privacy setting on maximum. By clicking the ‘settings’ menu you can limit your seen data.

According to a study by The Safe Shop, 66% of social media users don’t have their privacy settings in use. This is quite a startling statistic and this can mean that anybody can use or see your personal information.

You can also limit your privacy on Twitter and Instagram but using an invite only method.

Think before you tweet, comment or post

Always think before you post! The worst thing you can do online is to use crude or offensive language. This will put a potential employer off straight away! Avoid any topics related to religion, politics or sexuality.

Twitter can be the most damaging as its aim is to be as open as possible.

Don’t discuss work

There is no point in running the risk when you talk about work online. It can be very easy for something to be taken out of context. There may even be a non-disclosure clause in your contract if you are employed, so be aware!

Join industry groups and interact

If you are professional using social media channels including Twitter and LinkedIn, feel free to interact with industry experts and show off your skills to recruiters or potential employers. This will maximise your chances of impressing and showing that you are willing to invest time in interacting with people in a similar field to you – this can also enhance your online credibility.

Keep separate profiles

It may be a wise idea to have two accounts, particularly on Twitter where you may want to maintain two types of personality. It can be a hassle to maintain multiple accounts but it stops the chance of unwanted posts being seen.

If you have old or unwanted social media profiles on Myspace and Bebo, delete them. There’s nothing worse than recruiters checking out what you were up to ten years ago when you were in your teens.

From the above points it can be seen that your dream job could be easily dashed by a single tweet or inappropriate post. Don’t ruin your chances of landing your dream job, or any job for that matter! Tidy up your social media and stay professional.

Content written by Joseph Hill: www.searchlaboratory.com

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How to write your LinkedIn profile

When creating your LinkedIn profile you need to keep in mind how the professional networking site will work best for you. Will you use it to create new business connections and opportunities? To help promote your business and services? To network with your colleagues with the hope of progressing through the company? You may use it for multiple purposes, but it’s wise to establish what these are before you build your profile. Here are some useful tips to get you started.

Be Approachable

If it’s obvious by your LinkedIn profile that you’re going in for the hard sell, people are going to be reluctant to connect with you. Including sales pitch terms or calls to action in your bio, for example: ‘If you’re looking to save money get in touch with me today’ are very off-putting and best avoided. Instead, write about your role in a matter-of-fact way, such as: ‘I currently work with a range of clients, helping them to reduce their spend’. This sounds a lot more professional and less forward.

 

Be Consistent

Your LinkedIn profile should be harmonious with the company you currently work for and the role you hold. For instance, you should include key phrases that your company uses to describe its message, products or services. This will help establish you as an expert in your field and cast a good impression on anyone who is scouting staff in this particular industry.

 

Be Succinct

Realistically, no one is likely to sit there and read your entire profile – especially if it’s very long. If you want people to take an interest in you, write short and well-worded descriptions of what your main tasks are, what you are currently focusing on and what your contribution to the company is. This can all be done in one medium sized paragraph. It’s better to capture people’s interest with bite-sized chunks of information rather than putting them off with endless waffle.

 

Be Selective

There’s no need to include every role you’ve ever done in your work history. It’s perfectly acceptable to select the most important ones and those you are most proud of. However, be careful of leaving significant gaps as this can create doubt in employers’ minds as to what you
were doing. It’s wise to fill in your history up to the point where you started on your career path – i.e. there’s no need to include your early jobs that weren’t very relevant to how you ended up in your current role.

 

Complete Your Profile

Conversely to the previous point, a profile mostly left blank looks pretty bad. It casts the reflection that you were either too lazy to fill it out or don’t have much to offer. Show that you’re dedicated to your career progression by taking the time to complete most of the fields. After all, people will not be interested in your profile unless they can actually find out more about you from it. Finally, make sure you add a professional profile photo as this helps potential employers put a face to a name and connect with your profile.

 

From Issue 16 of Career Savvy – subscribe for free at www.careersavvy.co.uk

Social Media and Recruitment Infographic

You know how much we love a good infographic here on the University of Cumbria careers blog, right?! This infographic from Staff.com has some useful information about how recruiters use social media, including some top tips for students – like checking what’s on your social media profiles – even if you don’t list them on your application, 75% of recruiters now check social media profiles, and a third of employers have rejected candidates based on something they found on their profiles.

You have been warned!!

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Social Media Coordinator – Friday’s Featured Vacancy 13/06/2014

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Job Title: Social Media Coordinator

Company: JTL Training

This position is for a fixed term of ten months.

Do you know your tweet from your status update? Could you coordinate an existing marketing calendar with online activity, optimising our visibility and relevancy? Are you able to track our social media influence and monitor how we are perceived as a business?
JTL, established since 1989, is the leading work-based learning provider in the building services engineering sector across England and Wales. We`re a not-for-profit charity offering advanced apprenticeships in electrical, engineering maintenance, and now mechanical engineering services comprising plumbing, heating and ventilating and refrigeration air-conditioning. We serve approximately 6,000 apprentices and 3,500 employers in 7 regions across England and Wales.

We need someone to join us and take charge of our already busy social media profile. On a day to day basis, as you can imagine, you will be updating our profiles with relevant and engaging messages. But this role also offers you scope to get involved in so much more, from contributing to the development of innovative media content across web, mobile and email platforms, to reporting usage statistics to the marketing teams and interested staff members.

You will also be responsible for maintaining and organising an image and picture library and assisting the team with print and digital projects as required. It goes without saying that you will need a solid understanding of social media engagement, excellent IT skills and be happy working on multiple projects at once. More than this, you will get to use your design software skills and knowledge of wordpress/umbraco or similar CMSs.

To discover more about this role – and the attractive rewards and prospects that go with it – please visit http://jobs.jtltraining.com/jobs/head-office-orpington-kent/social-media-coordinator/812/ and apply online.

You can find hundreds of jobs on the University’s JobShop at http://cumbria.prospects.ac.uk

Tips for Using Social Media to Market Yourself to Graduate Employers – Part 2 of 2

If you haven’t seen Monday’s post, which is part 1 of this mini series, head on back there now, I’ll wait for you here! Part 1.

Great content is not only in written format. The internet gives you the opportunity to post videos, pictures, make podcasts etc etc. Utilise the media forms with which you feel the most comfortable. Create relentlessly. Learnt something new? Post something. Done something interesting? Post something. Read an interesting article? Post something. You get the idea. You can never post enough content. If you are interested, read more about content marketing at  blog.hubspot.com. The principles applied to marketing for businesses here can be extrapolated to yourself.

4 Engage in conversations

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Twitter is a fantastic tool. Use it to search for relevant conversations about your chosen career area and engage in them. Use the search bar at the top of Twitter and search for relevant terms. Once you get some Tweet results, engage in the conversations that are occurring. Be complimentary and conversational. If you are interested in becoming an engineer and you find someone who is talking about a tough project they are working on, ask a question, show interest. Questions are always the best way to engage. The best companies will respond to questions so you should search these companies out and start to ask away. Try to get on their radar by being friendly, inquisitive and complimentary.

5 Do it all in one place

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Evidencing your skills and engaging with employers can all be done in one place – on Kloodle. The site is a Social Network for Graduate Recruitment. Your profile gives you the ability to create your professional presence and engage with potential employers.

The initial part of the profile is like a CV where you list your education, employment and achievements. The second part of the profile is dynamic and gives you the chance to showcase your ability to potential employers. Like above, you can create engaging content and showcase your skills.

This can be done via blog posts, videos, photos and document uploads. In these you can tag the skills you demonstrate in that particular piece of media. An employer can then view each of your skills through the evidence you create.

Kloodle then enables you to interact with potential employers, engaging in conversations and putting yourself on their radar long before you graduate. You will get jobs for which you are relevant for posted directly to your newsfeed. No longer will you have to search Google for irrelevant jobs – you will see them right in front of your nose. Your Kloodle profile will be searched for by employers interested in people like you. You will be on the map before you even apply.

Creating a great profile is easy – download the ebook guide here: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/418688

Create your profile today – http://kloodle.com

We would love to hear from you – send us a tweet @kloodleuk